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Child Care Report

Declining Child Care Options for Young Children – Full Report

Child care across the state and nation suffers from an extraordinary lack of public resources. Greater investments from local, state, and federal partners are needed to stabilize our community’s child care system, allow child care workers to earn a living wage, and ensure children receive the care and support they need to thrive. The purpose of this report is to inform leaders in Rochester, Monroe County, and New York State about the growing shortage of regulated care for young children, and to identify policies that can strengthen this crucial support for families.

Child Care Report Executive Summary Cover

Declining Child Care Options for Young Children – Executive Summary

Child care across the state and nation suffers from an extraordinary lack of public resources. Greater investments from local, state, and federal partners are needed to stabilize our community’s child care system, allow child care workers to earn a living wage, and ensure children receive the care and support they need to thrive. The purpose of this report is to inform leaders in Rochester, Monroe County, and New York State about the growing shortage of regulated care for young children, and to identify policies that can strengthen this crucial support for families.

2018-19 City of Rochester Budget Review Cover

2018-2019 TCA Review of City Proposed Budget

Among local public entities who touch the lives of children and youth, the City has unique opportunities. City decisions impact every aspect of a child’s life – housing, neighborhoods, education, literacy, public safety, healthy environments, physical activity, recreation, employment and more.

2016 Healthy Weight Leadership Council Outcomes Report

The following ideas were derived from HWLC strategy briefs..

– Community Members advocate for a tax on sugary beverages in Rochester
– Food Pantries and emergency meal programs adopt healthy donation standards
– Child Care settings support all new parents’ decisions to breastfeed
– Restaurants and food courts only provide water or low-fat milk on children’s menus
– Schools eliminate sugary drink offerings at all school-related activities and events
– Child care and early education settings provide children with two to three occasions to play outdoors daily
– Ensure that water be available in public places, recreation areas, and schools in Rochester

2016-17 City of Rochester Budget Review Cover

2016-2017 TCA Review of City Proposed Budget

The total 2016-17 adopted budget for the City of Rochester is $517M, 2.3% higher than the 2015-16 amended budget of $505M. The property tax levy for City taxpayers is $154.2M (up $2.9M from last year) due to an 8% increase in total assessed value of property. The average homeowner will see his/her tax bill decrease by $15.85 per year, and business owners will see their tax bill decrease by an average of $215.22. The City expects sales tax revenue to increase by $1.63M. Refuse and Local Works rates are held steady; Water rates increase by 3%.

The City’s workforce grows by a net of 13 full-time positions, including 3 in the Department of Recreation and Youth Services (DRYS). A $6M allocation from New York State for anti-poverty efforts was used to cover the costs of maintaining existing programs such as the Office of Innovation and capital projects in the RMAPI target neighborhoods.

2013-14 City of Rochester Budget Review Cover

2013-2014 TCA Review of City Proposed Budget

In this analysis of the proposed 2013-14 City budget, The Children’s Agenda finds that the Mayor proposes a budget for the City of Rochester that spares children and youth any negative impact. Despite needing to close a projected budget gap of $42.7 million, the budget includes new investments in after-school programming and youth employment strategies. These are positive steps toward halting a decade-long decline in overall funding for City programs that directly touch the lives of Rochester’s children. Additionally, we note in this analysis the City’s investment in capital expenditures important for children and youth including play apparatus, parks and ball fields, and Dept. of Recreation and Youth Services (DRYS) facilities.

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