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Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Early Intervention System

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

Some disaggregated data are available on children receiving Early Intervention services in the state, both through public reports and Freedom of Information Law requests, but county-level and intersectional (e.g., race and gender) data remain unavailable. This information is critical to ensure the State is providing equitable access to timely Early Intervention services, especially for children of color, low-income children, and those in rural or large urban areas.

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Pre-K and Preschool Special Education

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities. 

Enrollment data are published yearly for Pre-Kindergarten students around the state by gender, race/ethnicity, economically disadvantaged status, English Language Learner status, and disability status. While the count of Pre-K students with disabilities is available statewide, there is no additional disaggregation or information available on how those children are being served. This information is critical to ensuring students are receiving the supports they are entitled to by law. 

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.   

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Child Care

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

There is little publicly available data regarding New York’s child care system, and no disaggregated data at all on the child care workforce or the children and families statewide who benefit from their services. While some state-level data exist on families receiving subsidized care, this is not enough to tell the story of how workers and families are experiencing the system and if their needs are truly being met.

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Behavioral Health

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities. 

New York’s children’s behavioral health system is complex, with minimal disaggregation of access and utilization data. While a lot of data are available at a regional- or county-level, few indicators are disaggregated further by important demographic categories like race, gender, or age group. These data limitations inhibit the State and community-based providers from identifying and meeting the unmet needs of children in the state, and prevent parents, advocates, and community stakeholders from being fully informed about the services they need in their communities.

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheets – All

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

This collection of fact sheets explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. We also provide recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

The project was a collaboration between three of New York’s leading children’s advocacy organizations: The Children’s Agenda, Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York, and the Schuyler Center for Analysis & Advocacy. Funding was provided by The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights Education Fund.

A Place to Call Home

Housing instability and child poverty are problems we can fix, if we can summon the political will to do so. New York State should identify housing stability as a top priority so every child has a consistent place to call home.

Children Left Out, Again

New York State has drafted a proposal that will be submitted to the US Department of Health and Human Services, requesting flexibility in how it uses Medicaid funds. Known as a “Medicaid waiver,” the proposal includes a request for $13.52 billion to be used over five years. The intent is to design innovative ways of using Medicaid funds that will promote health equity and address health disparities. Despite the fact this waiver is focused on equity, the investments in the current proposal are not aligned with the needs of the poorest and most diverse population of New Yorkers who rely on Medicaid: children.

Community Schools Data Synthesis

A review was done of research and evaluations on community schools throughout the country plus available data on community schools in Rochester. Synthesis of the information can inform development of a community school system. There are varying principles community schools are based on, including collaboration, equity, and a mixed model. Community schools can impact students, teachers, families, communities, and systems. In Rochester the demographics of community schools are, overall, proportionate to the district, but notable variability exists. Current academic outcomes and available staff also vary greatly. Needs assessments indicate priorities for strengthening relationships, supporting social-emotional learning and restorative practices, increasing academic support, meeting basic needs, and engaging families

2020 Policy Brief: Paying the Highest Price

The Rochester City School District (RCSD) is facing unprecedented mid-year reductions in education aid from New York State. These cuts surpass the losses faced by any other school district in Monroe County, and are among the highest of any school district in New York State. The state’s current approach to budget reductions disproportionately targets districts with the highest needs, undermines the purpose of New York State aid to local school districts, and bolsters institutional racism in our community. 

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