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Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Pre-K and Preschool Special Education

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities. 

Enrollment data are published yearly for Pre-Kindergarten students around the state by gender, race/ethnicity, economically disadvantaged status, English Language Learner status, and disability status. While the count of Pre-K students with disabilities is available statewide, there is no additional disaggregation or information available on how those children are being served. This information is critical to ensuring students are receiving the supports they are entitled to by law. 

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.   

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheets – All

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

This collection of fact sheets explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. We also provide recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

The project was a collaboration between three of New York’s leading children’s advocacy organizations: The Children’s Agenda, Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York, and the Schuyler Center for Analysis & Advocacy. Funding was provided by The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights Education Fund.

Why RCSD’s School Board Should Develop a More Inclusive and Comprehensive Plan to Restructure Pre-Kindergarten

The Rochester City School District (RCSD) Board of Education has approved a shift of as many as 500 PreK slots from existing neighborhood providers into two district-run schools starting next school year by a
5-2 vote. We applaud Commissioners LeBron and Elliott for opposing the plan and standing up for a more cautious and thoughtful approach. Now it is critically important to maximize potential benefits to
children and families and minimize any potential harm.

RCSD should immediately establish a Board-Staff-Community Task Force to develop a comprehensive Pre-K and early elementary enrollment plan.

Child Care Report

Declining Child Care Options for Young Children – Full Report

Child care across the state and nation suffers from an extraordinary lack of public resources. Greater investments from local, state, and federal partners are needed to stabilize our community’s child care system, allow child care workers to earn a living wage, and ensure children receive the care and support they need to thrive. The purpose of this report is to inform leaders in Rochester, Monroe County, and New York State about the growing shortage of regulated care for young children, and to identify policies that can strengthen this crucial support for families.

Child Care Report Executive Summary Cover

Declining Child Care Options for Young Children – Executive Summary

Child care across the state and nation suffers from an extraordinary lack of public resources. Greater investments from local, state, and federal partners are needed to stabilize our community’s child care system, allow child care workers to earn a living wage, and ensure children receive the care and support they need to thrive. The purpose of this report is to inform leaders in Rochester, Monroe County, and New York State about the growing shortage of regulated care for young children, and to identify policies that can strengthen this crucial support for families.

2014 ROC the Future – State of Our Children Report

Although the ROC the Future collaborative is tracking more than forty measures, the 2014 Report Card grades progress on selected milestones on the cradle to college/career pathway. The indicators were selected by the ROC the Future collaborative action network members, networks made up of volunteer professionals and community members with expertise and experience in areas like school readiness, extended learning, and college preparation. Like all of ROC the Future, the 2014 Report Card supports collective action aimed at improving outcomes for Rochester’s children.

2013 ROC the Future – State of Our Children Report

Although the ROC the Future collaborative is tracking more than forty measures, the report card provides “grades” for the selected milestones on the cradle to college/career pathway. The indicators were selected by the ROC the Future collaborative action network members, networks made up of volunteer professionals and community members with expertise and experience in areas like school readiness, extended learning, and college preparation. Like all of ROC the Future, the Report Card supports collective action aimed at improving outcomes for Rochester’s children.

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