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Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Behavioral Health

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities. 

New York’s children’s behavioral health system is complex, with minimal disaggregation of access and utilization data. While a lot of data are available at a regional- or county-level, few indicators are disaggregated further by important demographic categories like race, gender, or age group. These data limitations inhibit the State and community-based providers from identifying and meeting the unmet needs of children in the state, and prevent parents, advocates, and community stakeholders from being fully informed about the services they need in their communities.

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheets – All

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

This collection of fact sheets explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. We also provide recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

The project was a collaboration between three of New York’s leading children’s advocacy organizations: The Children’s Agenda, Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York, and the Schuyler Center for Analysis & Advocacy. Funding was provided by The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights Education Fund.

Children Left Out, Again

New York State has drafted a proposal that will be submitted to the US Department of Health and Human Services, requesting flexibility in how it uses Medicaid funds. Known as a “Medicaid waiver,” the proposal includes a request for $13.52 billion to be used over five years. The intent is to design innovative ways of using Medicaid funds that will promote health equity and address health disparities. Despite the fact this waiver is focused on equity, the investments in the current proposal are not aligned with the needs of the poorest and most diverse population of New Yorkers who rely on Medicaid: children.

2020 Policy Brief: Reopening Schools

The Children’s Agenda is deeply concerned that school closures are disproportionately harming our most vulnerable children. We believe schools need to reopen safely as soon as possible, but are concerned the politicization of the issue, and the lack of sufficient resources and clear guidelines for schools, is putting reopening—and children’s wellbeing—in jeopardy.

2016 Healthy Weight Leadership Council Outcomes Report

The following ideas were derived from HWLC strategy briefs..

– Community Members advocate for a tax on sugary beverages in Rochester
– Food Pantries and emergency meal programs adopt healthy donation standards
– Child Care settings support all new parents’ decisions to breastfeed
– Restaurants and food courts only provide water or low-fat milk on children’s menus
– Schools eliminate sugary drink offerings at all school-related activities and events
– Child care and early education settings provide children with two to three occasions to play outdoors daily
– Ensure that water be available in public places, recreation areas, and schools in Rochester

2013 ROC the Future – State of Our Children Report

Although the ROC the Future collaborative is tracking more than forty measures, the report card provides “grades” for the selected milestones on the cradle to college/career pathway. The indicators were selected by the ROC the Future collaborative action network members, networks made up of volunteer professionals and community members with expertise and experience in areas like school readiness, extended learning, and college preparation. Like all of ROC the Future, the Report Card supports collective action aimed at improving outcomes for Rochester’s children.

2013 Budget Review Cover

2013-2014 TCA Review of New York State Budget

Governor Cuomo’s proposed budget for FY2013–‐14 includes initiatives that will benefit New
York’s children as well as funding cuts that raise serious concern. We applaud the Governor’s allocations for child care subsidies, pre–‐kindergarten, extended learning and Pay for Success contracts. We strongly object to reductions in the Nurse Family Partnership program and Runaway and Homeless Youth services.

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