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Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Behavioral Health

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities. 

New York’s children’s behavioral health system is complex, with minimal disaggregation of access and utilization data. While a lot of data are available at a regional- or county-level, few indicators are disaggregated further by important demographic categories like race, gender, or age group. These data limitations inhibit the State and community-based providers from identifying and meeting the unmet needs of children in the state, and prevent parents, advocates, and community stakeholders from being fully informed about the services they need in their communities.

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheets – All

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

This collection of fact sheets explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. We also provide recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

The project was a collaboration between three of New York’s leading children’s advocacy organizations: The Children’s Agenda, Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York, and the Schuyler Center for Analysis & Advocacy. Funding was provided by The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights Education Fund.

New York State Budget 2024-2025

New York had an opportunity to transform the way we serve children. However, with the notable exceptions of Early Intervention and continuous Medicaid coverage for children from birth to six, our elected officials mostly opted for investments that are for one year only.

2020 Policy Brief: Reopening Schools

The Children’s Agenda is deeply concerned that school closures are disproportionately harming our most vulnerable children. We believe schools need to reopen safely as soon as possible, but are concerned the politicization of the issue, and the lack of sufficient resources and clear guidelines for schools, is putting reopening—and children’s wellbeing—in jeopardy.

2016 Healthy Weight Leadership Council Outcomes Report

The following ideas were derived from HWLC strategy briefs..

– Community Members advocate for a tax on sugary beverages in Rochester
– Food Pantries and emergency meal programs adopt healthy donation standards
– Child Care settings support all new parents’ decisions to breastfeed
– Restaurants and food courts only provide water or low-fat milk on children’s menus
– Schools eliminate sugary drink offerings at all school-related activities and events
– Child care and early education settings provide children with two to three occasions to play outdoors daily
– Ensure that water be available in public places, recreation areas, and schools in Rochester

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