Home > Publications > Early Intervention

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheet – Early Intervention System

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

Some disaggregated data are available on children receiving Early Intervention services in the state, both through public reports and Freedom of Information Law requests, but county-level and intersectional (e.g., race and gender) data remain unavailable. This information is critical to ensure the State is providing equitable access to timely Early Intervention services, especially for children of color, low-income children, and those in rural or large urban areas.

This fact sheet is part of a collection that explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. Please click here to view the full set, including recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

Data Disaggregation Fact Sheets – All

Disaggregated data are critical to ensuring all of New York’s children and families have equitable access to the services they need to thrive. By understanding who is and who is not being served by the state’s early childhood systems, we can better identify and address systemic inequities.

This collection of fact sheets explores the state of data disaggregation in four of New York’s key early childhood systems: Early Intervention, Child Care, Pre-Kindergarten & Preschool Special Education, and Behavioral Health. We also provide recommendations for state and local leaders, as well as advocates, on ways to improve the collection and public reporting of disaggregated data across systems.

The project was a collaboration between three of New York’s leading children’s advocacy organizations: The Children’s Agenda, Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York, and the Schuyler Center for Analysis & Advocacy. Funding was provided by The Leadership Conference on Civil & Human Rights Education Fund.

2013 Budget Review Cover

2013-2014 TCA Review of New York State Budget

Governor Cuomo’s proposed budget for FY2013–‐14 includes initiatives that will benefit New
York’s children as well as funding cuts that raise serious concern. We applaud the Governor’s allocations for child care subsidies, pre–‐kindergarten, extended learning and Pay for Success contracts. We strongly object to reductions in the Nurse Family Partnership program and Runaway and Homeless Youth services.

2012-2013 TCA Review of New York State Budget

The Children’s Agenda recognizes that the Governor is responsible for developing a budget that is both fiscally and socially responsible and this is no easy task. To say that economic times are tight for State government is an understatement. It is especially in these tight times, though that we must continue to invest in prevention.

Preventing abuse, learning problems, and youth crime and delinquency is a proven way to benefit the economy and strengthen families, better ensuring that the children of New York State grow up to be healthy, productive citizens.

In the 2012–‐2103 budget, Governor Cuomo has made some choices that will benefit New York State’s children, but some important areas have been missed.

Skip to content